Cancer news

Latest news, press releases and blog posts from Cancer Research UK.

Diagnosing Cancer

Unclear if cancer test funding is being used as intended

NHS funding designed to improve cancer early diagnosis might not be reaching the right services, according to a new report.

Prostate MRI scans could help some men avoid invasive biopsy

More than a quarter of men with suspected prostate cancer could avoid invasive biopsies if they’re offered an MRI scan first, a new study suggests.

Overdiagnosis: when finding cancer can do more harm than good

With new cancer detection technology on the horizon, ranging from blood tests to wristbands, understanding overdiagnosis is a huge challenge.

A routine blood test for cancer would be fantastic. Today’s news isn’t it

A cancer blood test is in the news today, but it's too early to say if it will work. We take a look at what questions still need to be answered.

Proportion of cancers diagnosed in A&E falling

The way in which cancers are diagnosed in England is improving, according to new figures.

Genetic link between breast condition and invasive breast cancer uncovered

The genetics behind how a breast condition becomes invasive breast cancer may be explained by a new study.

Cutting cancer diagnosis delays means understanding each patient’s journey

GPs say that more than 1 in 5 cancer patients in England experience an avoidable delay in their diagnosis.

Bowel screening and car park cancer scans: what you need to know about the latest NHS announcements

NHS chief, Simon Stevens, has made a string of announcements that he says will help the NHS in England diagnose cancers earlier and improve cancer services.

Test could diagnose oesophageal cancer 8 years earlier

A new genetic test could help diagnose oesophageal cancer up to 8 years before symptoms appear in people at a high risk of the disease.

Test could diagnose oesophageal cancer 8 years earlier

A new genetic test could help diagnose oesophageal cancer up to 8 years before symptoms appear in people at a high risk of the disease.

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