Cancer news

Latest news, press releases and blog posts from Cancer Research UK.

Childrens Cancer

Collection of celebrity short stories raises money for research into children’s cancers

To coincide with World Book Day, 2 March 2017, Cancer Research UK Kids & Teens is launching a collection of short stories and poems written by celebrities.

Children’s cancer survival continues to increase

Children diagnosed with cancer in England are now more likely to survive for at least 5 years compared to 25 years ago.

Engineered immune cell treatment for childhood leukaemia may be a step closer

An immunotherapy treatment using genetically engineered cells has been used to successfully treat two infants with an aggressive kind of leukaemia.

Meet the scientists tackling brain tumours, investigating a cancer ‘master switch’ and much more

Meet our new leaders, who are spearheading research to tackle some of the biggest questions we need to answer to help more people survive cancer.

Children’s cancer survivors face a tough question: do you want to ever have kids?

We spoke to four young cancer survivors about the fertility issues they faced after cancer treatment.

Children’s cancer death rates drop over 20 years

The rate of children dying from cancer has fallen by more than 30 per cent in the last 20 years, according to the latest figures released by Cancer Research UK.

Childhood cancer survivors live longer, but not necessarily with better health

Children diagnosed with cancer in the 90s are living longer than those diagnosed in the 1970s.

Why I became a children’s cancer researcher – Richard’s story

Professor Richard Gilbertson's journey into research began in medical school. Find out what motivated him to become a world-leading expert in children's brain tumours.

Sellafield, radiation and childhood cancer – shedding light on cancer clusters near nuclear sites

A new report confirms that radiation from a nuclear plant wasn't to blame for a spike in childhood leukaemia in north-west England - so what was?

Improving treatments for childhood nerve cancer means understanding its complexity

New research points to a possible way to help personalise treatment for a type of childhood cancer.

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