Cancer news

Latest news, press releases and blog posts from Cancer Research UK.

Cancer Genes

‘A handful’ of gene faults can turn a healthy cell cancerous

Fewer than 10 errors in the DNA inside cells are enough to drive development of a cancer, according to new estimates.

News digest – obesity costs, radiologist shortage, breast cancer risk, and… avatars?

The growing global cost of obesity was in the news this week, along with genetic tests for breast cancer and a rare childhood cancer.

DNA

Study reveals genetic diversity of cancer that has spread

New research into the genetic and molecular features of cancers that have spread has revealed the diversity of these tumours and the immune cells within.

Cancer gene map uncovers potential new treatment targets

Researchers in the US have created comprehensive maps of genes that tumour cells rely on to survive.

Study estimates breast and ovarian cancer risk linked to faulty BRCA genes

A new study has estimated the ages at which women with faults in two particular genes are most at risk of developing breast and ovarian cancer.

Science Surgery: ‘What factors lead to a cell becoming cancerous?’

Our Science Surgery series answers your cancer science questions. Read our answer to Patrick's question.

Tracking unstable chromosomes helps predict lung cancer’s return

The first findings from the Cancer Research UK-funded TRACERx* lung cancer study show how tracking tumour evolution can help predict relapse.

CRT pioneer fund, Cancer Research UK and NCI collaborate to boost research against the ‘undruggable’ RAS

Cancer Research UK and the Cancer Research Technology Pioneer Fund have committed £2.5 million in collaboration with the National Cancer Institute.

9 burning questions about CRISPR genome editing answered

In this post we’ll be exploring the gene editing technology CRISPR by answering some of the most common questions that pop up.

More breast cancer patients than previously thought could benefit from existing targeted treatment

As many as 1 in 5 women with breast cancer could benefit from a drug used to treat ovarian cancer, according to new estimates.

Pages