Cancer news

Latest news, press releases and blog posts from Cancer Research UK.

Cancer Drugs

NICE says 'not enough data' to approve drug for ovarian cancer

NICE says it cannot give a positive decision over whether to recommend a new drug for ovarian cancer unless its makers provide more information on cost.

New drug combo could make cancer more sensitive to chemo

Combining chemotherapy with new drugs that target a protein that helps cancer cells to withstand chemotherapy could drastically improve treatment

Cancer Research UK and Cancer Research Technology announce partnership with Monopar Therapeutics to develop new oncology compound

Cancer Research UK, Cancer Research Technology (CRT) and Monopar Therapeutics LLC will take forward an antibody treatment HuATN-658 into clinical trials.

Earlier chemotherapy extends lives of men with advanced prostate cancer

A UK-led trial has found that combining a chemotherapy drug with hormone treatment extended the lives of men with advanced prostate cancer.

New drug to enter trials for drug-resistant blood cancer patients

Researchers have developed an experimental treatment to overcome resistance to drugs used to treat cancers of the blood.

Research opens new avenue for bile duct cancer treatment trials

Researchers in Edinburgh have discovered how a molecular mechanism drives the growth of bile duct cancer.

Revamped drug may overcome resistance in brain tumours

Cancer Research UK scientists have taken steps to overcome drug resistance in glioblastoma, the most common type of brain tumour in adults.

Combining drugs may help fight drug resistance in breast cancer

US researchers have found that combining conventional therapy with an experimental cancer drug helped overcome drug resistance in breast cancer cells.

New drug 'more effective' than chemo for certain patients with advanced lung cancer

A new drug – crizotinib (Xalkori) – may be more beneficial than chemotherapy for some lung cancer patients.

Experimental drug shrinks lung cancer tumours in mice

Tumours formed from lung cancer cells completely disappeared in mice treated with an experimental drug, US scientists say.

Pages