Follow up for myeloma | Cancer Research UK
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Follow up for myeloma

Men and women discussing myeloma

This page is about follow up appointments if you have had myeloma. There is information about


What happens at follow up appointments

It is likely that the myeloma will become active again at some stage after you have finished treatment. Because of this, you will have regular check ups with your specialist following your treatment. These check ups will usually be every 1 to 3 months and will continue for life. During these visits you will have blood tests and urine tests. If you have any new bone pain you may need X-rays.

At these check ups your doctor will check for any signs that the myeloma is active so that it can be treated. The doctor will also be checking or monitoring any longer term side effects from your treatment, such as tingling or numbness in your hands and feet (peripheral neuropathy).

Your doctor will ask you how you feel and whether you have had any symptoms or are worried about anything.


If you are worried between appointments

If you are worried or notice any new symptoms between appointments, you must let your doctor or nurse know as soon as possible. You don’t have to wait until your next appointment. 

Many people find support groups and counselling helpful after cancer treatment. This can be a time when people feel very anxious and low, even though the treatment has finished. To find out about counselling and how to find a counsellor, look in the counselling section. Some of the organisations on our myeloma organisations page can tell you about local support groups. Your specialist cancer nurse may also be able to tell you about local groups.

To share experiences online, go to CancerChat - our online forum.

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Updated: 4 January 2016