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Staging hairy cell leukaemia

Men and women discussing hairy cell leukaemia

This page tells you about staging hairy cell leukaemia (HCL). There is information about

 

A quick guide to what's on this page

Staging hairy cell leukaemia

Stage means how far a cancer has grown or developed when it is diagnosed. Most types of cancer have a numbered stage, but there is not a widely agreed staging system for hairy cell leukaemia (HCL). Your doctor works out your treatment for HCL based on any symptoms you have and your general health and fitness.

Specialists generally use two symptoms as a way of measuring how far hairy cell leukaemia has developed.

CR PDF Icon You can view and print the quick guides for all the pages in the Treating hairy cell leukaemia section.

 

What staging is

Stage means how far a cancer has grown or developed when it is diagnosed. Once your test results are all complete, your doctors will know more about how far your leukaemia has developed. Most types of cancer have a numbered stage, but staging is not really used for hairy cell leukaemia (HCL).

Your doctor works out your treatment for HCL based on any symptoms you have and your general health and fitness. Specialists generally use two symptoms as a way of measuring how far hairy cell leukaemia has developed. These are

  • Your level of anaemia (your red blood cell count)
  • The size of your spleen

There are different ways of staging the various types of chronic leukaemia. If you are looking for information about the stages of other types of chronic leukaemia this is not the right section for you. You can find information about staging for chronic myeloid leukaemia or chronic lymphocytic leukaemia on these links.

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Updated: 16 April 2015