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Getting better after treatment for brain tumours

Men and women discussing brain tumours

This page is about getting better after treatment for a brain tumour.

A quick guide to what's on this page

Getting better after treatment for brain tumours

Brain tumour treatment can feel like a long haul. It will leave you physically and emotionally drained. You will need time to recover your energy and spirits. Some people also have physical after effects. You may have

  • A weakness on one side of your body, in an arm or leg
  • Difficulty walking or moving in other ways
  • Difficulty with speech or understanding
  • Fits (seizures)

You could have any number of different symptoms, depending on where your brain tumour was. In time, you may well overcome any problems that remain after your treatment. You may or may not get completely back to normal, but there will always be room for some improvement.

Help and support

It is best to start any therapy you need as early as possible. Your treatment team can arrange for you to see any relevant health professionals. These may include physiotherapists, occupational therapists or speech and language therapists. Don’t be afraid to push for this support if it isn’t arranged automatically. You have a right to care that will help you to recover as fully as possible. Such therapy can make a lot of difference to your quality of life.

 

CR PDF Icon You can view and print the quick guides for all the pages in the Living with brain tumours section.

 

Recovering

The treatment for a brain tumour can feel like a long haul. It will leave you physically and emotionally drained. You will need time to recover your energy and spirits.

You may also have physical after effects, although this is not always the case. You may have

  • A weakness on one side of your body, in an arm or leg
  • Difficulty walking or moving in other ways
  • Difficulty with speech or understanding
  • Fits (seizures)

You could have any number of different symptoms, depending on where your brain tumour was. In time, you may well overcome any problems that remain after your treatment. The human brain is remarkable. In time, another area of your brain will learn to take over some of the functions that were affected by the tumour or its treatment. You may or may not get completely back to normal, but help is always available for you.

Help and support

It is best to start any therapy you need as early as possible. For example, physiotherapy or speech therapy. Don’t be afraid to push for this if it isn’t arranged automatically. Speech therapy particularly can be hard to come by in some parts of the UK. You have a right to care that will help you to recover as fully as possible. Such therapy can make a lot of difference to your quality of life.

Your treatment team can arrange for you to see any relevant health professionals. These may include

  • Physiotherapists – people who treat illness by physical methods such as manipulating joints and muscles, massage and heat treatment. They can help you to get back movement in areas of the body
  • An occupational therapist – a person trained to help people with any sort of disability to manage day to day activities such as dressing, cooking, cleaning etc
  • A speech and language therapist – a person trained to help people learn how to speak and swallow properly. If you have surgery to your brain, you may need to see a speech therapist to learn how to speak or understand language in a new way
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Updated: 31 December 2013