Gestational trophoblastic tumour research | Cancer Research UK
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Gestational trophoblastic tumour research

Men and women discussing gestational trophoblastic tumours

This page tells you about research into gestational trophoblastic tumours (GTT for short). There is information about

 

A quick guide to what's on this page

Molar pregnancy and gestational trophoblastic tumour research

All treatments must be fully researched before they can be adopted as standard treatment for everyone. This is so that we can be sure they work better than the treatments we already use. And so we know that they are safe.

First of all, treatments are developed and tested in laboratories. Only after we know that they are likely to be safe are they tested in people, in clinical trials. Cancer Research UK supports a lot of UK laboratory research into cancer and also supports many UK and international clinical trials.

Treatment for molar pregnancy and other types of gestational trophoblastic tumour (GTT) is generally very successful.  But doctors are still testing better ways of preventing, diagnosing and treating them.

 

CR PDF Icon You can view and print the quick guides for all the pages in the treating molar pregnancy section.

 

 

Why research is done

All treatments have to be fully researched before they can be adopted as standard treatment for everyone. This is so that

  • We can be sure they work
  • We can be sure they work better than the treatments that are available at the moment
  • They are known to be safe

Firstly, treatments are developed and tested in laboratories. For ethical and safety reasons, experimental treatments must be tested in the laboratory before they can be tried in patients. If a treatment described here is said to be at the laboratory stage of research, it is not ready for patients and is not available either within or outside the NHS. Cancer Research UK supports a lot of UK laboratory research into cancer.

Tests in patients are called clinical trials. Cancer Research UK supports many UK and international clinical trials.

Go to our clinical trials database to find out more about trials

If you are interested in a particular trial, print the information off and take it to your own specialist. If the trial is suitable for you, your doctor will need to make the referral to the research team. The database also has information about closed trials and trial results.

All the new approaches covered here are the subject of ongoing research. Until studies are completed and new effective treatments are found, these potential new treatments aren’t part of standard therapy for gestational trophoblastic tumours (GTT).

 

Research into treatment for GTT

Treatment for GTT is very successful and more than 98% of women with these conditions are cured. There aren't often trials looking into the treatment of GTTs. This is mainly because they are such rare tumours and current treatments work so well. 

There is one trial looking at chemotherapy for GTTs. The researchers are comparing actinomycin D and methotrexate. Both these drugs work well, but how you have them and the side effects they cause can be different. The women taking part have persistent disease that is considered low risk.

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Updated: 22 June 2016