Screening for persistent trophoblastic disease and choriocarcinoma | Cancer Research UK
Cancer Research UK on Google+ Cancer Research UK on Facebook Cancer Research UK on Twitter

Screening for persistent trophoblastic disease and choriocarcinoma

Men and women discussing gestational trophoblastic tumours

This page has information about screening for persistent trophoblastic disease and choriocarcinoma – they are types of tumours known as gestational trophoblastic tumours (GTT for short). There is information below about

 

A quick guide to what's on this page

Screening for persistent trophoblastic disease and choriocarcinoma

Persistent trophoblastic disease and choriocarcinomas belong to a group of pregnancy related tumours known as gestational trophoblastic tumours (GTTs). Persistent trophoblastic disease occurs in some women after an abnormal pregnancy called a molar pregnancy. Choriocarcinoma can occur after a normal pregnancy, a molar pregnancy, a miscarriage or a termination of pregnancy (an abortion).

Screening means testing for the early stages of a disease before there are any symptoms.

Checking for GTT

The best way to pick up a molar pregnancy early is to have the routine antenatal care provided by your doctor and midwife during pregnancy. They will keep a close eye on you and do various tests to make sure your baby is developing normally. Early in your pregnancy you have an ultrasound scan to look for any abnormalities. Ultrasound scanning can pick up GTTs very early. Your doctor will also do tests if you have any abnormal symptoms that might indicate a GTT, such as vaginal bleeding. If you have a miscarriage or abortion, doctors also check the placenta for any abnormalities.

If you have had a molar pregnancy, you will be under the care of a specialist centre. They will monitor you closely for signs of persistent trophoblastic disease.

 

CR PDF Icon You can view and print the quick guides for all the pages in the about persistent trophoblastic disease and choriocarcinoma section.

 

 

What persistent trophoblastic disease and choriocarcinomas are

Persistent trophoblastic disease and choriocarcinomas belong to a group of pregnancy related tumours known as gestational trophoblastic tumours (GTTs). Persistent trophoblastic disease occurs in some women after an abnormal pregnancy called a molar pregnancy. Choriocarcinoma can occur after a normal pregnancy, a molar pregnancy, a miscarriage or a termination of pregnancy (an abortion).

 

What screening is

Screening means testing for the early stages of a disease before there are any symptoms. There is no national screening programme for persistent trophoblastic tumours or choriocarcinoma. But if you have had a molar pregnancy you will have regular tests to check whether you have persistent trophoblastic disease.

 

Checking for GTT

The best way to pick up a molar pregnancy early is to have the routine pregnancy (antenatal) care provided by your doctor and midwife. They will keep a close eye on you and do various tests to make sure your baby is developing normally. Early in your pregnancy you have an ultrasound scan to look for any abnormalities. Ultrasound scanning can pick up many molar pregnancies very early. Your doctor will also do tests if you have any abnormal symptoms that might be a sign of a GTT.

If you have a miscarriage or abortion, doctors check the placenta for any abnormalities.

If you have had a molar pregnancy, you will be under the care of a specialist hospital. They will monitor you closely for signs of persistent trophoblastic disease or choriocarcinoma.

Read more about molar pregnancy

 

Specialist centres for GTT

In the UK there are 3 specialist hospitals for women with a GTT. All women diagnosed with any type of GTT are registered at one of these centres for follow up. The centres are at

  • Charing Cross Hospital in London
  • Weston Park Hospital in Sheffield
  • Ninewells Hospital in Dundee

Weston Park Hospital and Charing Cross Hospital are also treatment centres for women who need chemotherapy for persistent trophoblastic disease or choriocarcinoma.

Rate this page:
Submit rating
Rate this page
Rate this page for no comments box
Please enter feedback to continue submitting
Send feedback
Question about cancer? Contact our information nurse team

No Error

Updated: 22 June 2016