A study looking at reporting side effects of radiotherapy for lung cancer (ASyMS-R)

Cancer type:

Lung cancer

Status:

Results

Phase:

Other

This study looked at using a mobile phone at home to report side effects of radiotherapy for lung cancer.

In this study, people with lung cancer used the mobile phone to record their radiotherapy side effects. Based on this they received self care information on the phone (if mild side effects were reported), or they received a call from a health care professional (if the side effects were more serious).

The aim of this study was to find out how well mobile phone side effect reporting worked for both patients and health care professionals.

Summary of results

The researchers found that mobile phone side effect reporting worked well for both patients and health care professionals.

13 health care professionals and 16 people having radiotherapy for lung cancer took part in this small study.

The researchers interviewed everyone to see how useful the mobile phone system was. When they looked at the results, the patients said that the mobile phone system

  • Was easy to use
  • Listed all relevant side effects
  • Helped them to manage their side effects well
  • Helped them to communicate well with the health care professionals.

The health care professionals said that the mobile phone system helped improve patient care because of

  • Instant access to reported side effects
  • Self care suggestions for side effects that patients could immediately put into practice

Although this was a small study, the researchers concluded that reporting side effects of radiotherapy using a mobile phone was both practical and acceptable for people with lung cancer and health care professionals.

We have based this summary on information from the team who ran the trial. The information they sent us has been reviewed by independent specialists (peer reviewed) and published in a medical journal. The figures we quote above were provided by the trial team. We have not analysed the data ourselves.

Recruitment start:

Recruitment end:

How to join a clinical trial

Please note: In order to join a trial you will need to discuss it with your doctor, unless otherwise specified.

Please note - unless we state otherwise in the summary, you need to talk to your doctor about joining a trial.

Chief Investigator

Professor Nora Kearney

Supported by

NIHR Clinical Research Network: Cancer
National Cancer Research Institute (NCRI)
University of Dundee
University of Stirling

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Last review date

CRUK internal database number:

Oracle 3171

Please note - unless we state otherwise in the summary, you need to talk to your doctor about joining a trial.

Over 60,000 cancer patients enrolled on clinical trials in the UK last year.

Last reviewed:

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