A trial looking at genetic factors that affect how breast cancer grows and develops (GENFABRCA)

Cancer type:

Breast cancer

Status:

Results

This study was looking at genetic factors that might affect how breast cancer cells develop, grow and respond to treatment.

Many breast cancers respond very well to treatment. But this is not always the case and sometimes breast cancer comes back. Doctors want to understand more about why this happens.

In this study, researchers were looking at differences in genes Open a glossary item from women with advanced breast cancer. The aim of the study was to try and find out how genetic factors may affect

  • How breast cancer develops
  • Why some breast cancers grow more quickly than others
  • How well different breast cancers respond to treatment

In the long term this may help doctors improve the treatment for breast cancer.

Trial results

The blood samples collected in this study are being looked at alongside samples from people in a large number of studies in other countries. By combining the data from many studies, researchers can learn more about genes that may be related to breast cancer and the risk associated with them.

The study team have advised us that they won’t be producing separate results from this study.

Recruitment start:

Recruitment end:

How to join a clinical trial

Please note: In order to join a trial you will need to discuss it with your doctor, unless otherwise specified.

Please note - unless we state otherwise in the summary, you need to talk to your doctor about joining a trial.

Chief Investigator

Prof Angela Cox

Supported by

Experimental Cancer Medicine Centre (ECMC)
National Institute for Health Research Cancer Research Network (NCRN)
Weston Park Hospital Cancer Appeal

Contact our cancer information nurses for other questions about cancer by:

Phone - 0808 800 4040

Last review date

Please note - unless we state otherwise in the summary, you need to talk to your doctor about joining a trial.

Harriet wanted to try new treatments

“I was keen to go on a clinical trial. I wanted to try new cancer treatments and hopefully help future generations.”

Last reviewed:

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