A trial looking at chemotherapy and rituximab for mantle cell lymphoma (Mantle Cell P3)

Please note - this trial is no longer recruiting patients. We hope to add results when they are available.

Cancer type:

Low grade lymphoma
Lymphoma
Non-Hodgkin lymphoma

Status:

Closed

Phase:

Phase 3

This trial is comparing chemotherapy combined with rituximab (Mabthera) and chemotherapy alone, for people with mantle cell lymphoma. This trial is supported by Cancer Research UK.

Doctors commonly use fludarabine and cyclophosphamide to treat mantle cell lymphoma. But unfortunately this treatment doesn’t always work very well and the lymphoma can begin to grow again.

Doctors think that giving rituximab as well as chemotherapy may be useful. But they are not sure yet how well this combination of treatment will work for mantle cell lymphoma.

In this trial you will either have chemotherapy alone, or chemotherapy with rituximab. The aim of the trial is to see which combination of treatment is better for mantle cell lymphoma.

Who can enter

You can enter this trial if you

  • Have been diagnosed with mantle cell lymphoma
  • Have not had treatment for your lymphoma yet and your doctors think you need treatment
  • Are well enough to have treatment
  • Are prepared to use reliable contraception while you are taking part in the trial if there is any chance that you or your partner could become pregnant
  • Are at least 18 years old

You cannot enter this trial if you

  • Have had chemotherapy in the past
  • Are known to be allergic to this type of monoclonal antibody
  • Have poor kidney or liver function
  • Are known to be HIV positive, have hepatitis B or hepatitis C (you will not need to be tested as part of this trial)
  • Have had any other cancer in the last 5 years, apart from in situ cancer of the cervix that was removed with an operation, or non melanoma skin cancer
  • Have any other serious medical condition that is not under control with medication
  • Are pregnant or breastfeeding

Trial design

This is a randomised trial. It will recruit about 400 patients into 2 groups. People taking part will be put into treatment groups by a computer. Neither you nor your doctor will be able to decide which group you are in.

If you are in group 1 you will have fludarabine and cyclophosphamide tablets daily for 3 days. You will then have no treatment for the next 3 and a half weeks. This 4 week period makes up a treatment cycle. If you cannot take tablets, you will have the chemotherapy as a drip into the vein.

If you are in group 2 you will have fludarabine and cyclophosphamide tablets daily for 3 days. You will then have no treatment for the next 3 and a half weeks. This 4 week period makes up a treatment cycle. If you cannot take tablets, you will have the chemotherapy as a drip into the vein. You will also have rituximab through a drip into a vein on the first day of each cycle.

Everyone taking part in this trial will have up to 4 cycles of treatment, and then have some tests. If the tests show the treatment is working, you will have up to 4 more cycles of treatment. But if the tests show that your lymphoma has continued to grow, your doctor will probably decide to stop treatment. They will discuss other treatment options with you.

The researchers would like to look at a sample of your lymphoma that was kept by the doctors when you had your biopsy. They will use this to find out more about any genetic changes Open a glossary item in lymphoma cells.

Hospital visits

You will go to the hospital for some tests before you can take part in the trial. These include

You may also need to have an endoscopy.

Everyone will go to hospital on the first day of each treatment cycle. You will see the doctors and have a physical examination and a blood test at each visit.

If you are taking the chemotherapy as tablets you will only need to come to the hospital on the first day of each cycle, and you can take your chemotherapy tablets at home. If you are in group 2 you will have rituximab on the first day of each cycle.

If you cannot take tablets, and you have chemotherapy as a drip into a vein, you will need to come to the hospital for treatment, on the first 3 days of each cycle.

You will have a CT scan after 4 cycles and 8 cycles of treatment, and you may also need to have further bone marrow tests.

After you finish treatment you will carry on seeing the doctors. Exactly how often you see the doctors will depend on the usual practice at your hospital. Your doctor will tell you more about this.

Side effects

The most common side effects of fludarabine and cyclophosphamide are

Rituximab doesn’t tend to cause serious side effects. But when you first have rituximab you may have side effects such as

  • Chills and fever
  • Feeling sick
  • Itchy rash
  • Headache

There’s more information about fludarabine, cyclophosphomide and rituximab on CancerHelp UK.

Recruitment start:

Recruitment end:

How to join a clinical trial

Please note: In order to join a trial you will need to discuss it with your doctor, unless otherwise specified.

Please note - unless we state otherwise in the summary, you need to talk to your doctor about joining a trial.

Chief Investigator

Professor Simon Rule

Supported by

Cancer Research UK
Experimental Cancer Medicine Centre (ECMC)
NIHR Clinical Research Network: Cancer
University College London (UCL)

Other information

This is Cancer Research UK trial number CRUK/06/013.

Questions about cancer? Contact our information nurses

Freephone 0808 800 4040

Last review date

CRUK internal database number:

543

Please note - unless we state otherwise in the summary, you need to talk to your doctor about joining a trial.

Cara took part in a clinical trial

A picture of Cara

"I am glad that taking part in a trial might help others on their own cancer journey.”

Last reviewed:

Rate this page:

No votes yet
Thank you!
We've recently made some changes to the site, tell us what you think