A trial to see if Decapeptyl can shrink your prostate gland before radiotherapy (EDVART)

Please note - this trial is no longer recruiting patients. We hope to add results when they are available.

Cancer type:

Prostate cancer

Status:

Closed

Phase:

Phase 2/3

This trial is looking at Decapeptyl (also known as triptorelin) to see how well it can shrink your prostate gland before you have radiotherapy for prostate cancer.

Doctors can treat prostate cancer with surgery, radiotherapy, or hormone therapy. The men taking part in this trial are going to have radiotherapy to try to cure their prostate cancer.

We know from research that having 3 months of hormone therapy before radiotherapy can shrink your prostate gland, and help the radiotherapy to work better. Goserelin (also known as Zoladex) is a hormone therapy drug that doctors often use. In this trial, the researchers are looking at another type of hormone therapy called Decapeptyl. They will compare it with Zoladex.

The aims of the study are to

  • See if Decapeptyl works as well as Zoladex at reducing the size of your prostate gland before radiotherapy
  • Learn more about the side effects and how the injections affect men’s quality of life Open a glossary item

Who can enter

You may be able to enter this trial if you

You cannot enter this trial if you

  • Have prostate cancer that has spread to another part of your body (your tumour is stage T4)
  • Have had hormone therapy in the last year
  • Have had another experimental drug in the last month
  • Are going to have chemotherapy or any other type of anti cancer drug in the next few months
  • Have had an operation called a TURP to remove part of your prostate gland
  • Have a tube in your bladder to drain urine (an indwelling catheter)
  • Have a very large prostate gland (the trial doctors can advise you about this)
  • Have been taking drugs called finasteride or dutasteride for less than 6 months (if you have been taking them for longer than 6 months or have taken them in the past but stopped at least 6 months ago, you can take part)

Trial design

The trial will recruit 72 men who are going to have radiotherapy to try to cure their prostate cancer. It is a randomised trial. The men taking part are put into treatment groups by a computer. Neither you nor your doctor will be able to decide which group you are in.

Men in one group have Decapeptyl injections once a month for 3 months before their radiotherapy. Men in the other group have Zoladex injections once a month for 3 months before their radiotherapy.

You have Decapeptyl injections into the muscle in your bottom. You have Zoladex injections under the skin of your tummy (abdomen). Everybody taking part also has bicalutamide tablets for 4 weeks. This is because the first hormone injection can cause your body to make more testosterone. This is called tumour flare. The bicalutamide tablets help to prevent tumour flare. After a few weeks you stop making testosterone so don’t need to carry on taking the tablets.

The trial team will ask you to fill out some questionnaires before you start treatment, each time you have an injection and after your last injection. The questionnaires will ask about any side effects you have had and about how you have been feeling. This is called a quality of life study.

Hospital visits

You will see the doctors and have some tests before you start treatment. The tests include

You go to hospital once a month for 3 months to see the trial team and have your injection. After the 3rd injection, you go back to see the trial team and have a transrectal ultrasound scan.

You will then have radiotherapy to try to cure your prostate cancer.

Side effects

The most common side effects of hormone therapy for prostate cancer include

  • Hot flushes
  • Decreased interest in having sex (loss of libido)
  • Difficulty getting an erection (impotence)

There is more information about the side effects of hormone therapy for prostate cancer on CancerHelp UK.

Recruitment start:

Recruitment end:

How to join a clinical trial

Please note: In order to join a trial you will need to discuss it with your doctor, unless otherwise specified.

Please note - unless we state otherwise in the summary, you need to talk to your doctor about joining a trial.

Chief Investigator

Dr Amit Bahl

Supported by

Ipsen
National Institute for Health Research Cancer Research Network (NCRN)
University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust

Questions about cancer? Contact our information nurses

Freephone 0808 800 4040

Last review date

CRUK internal database number:

Oracle 8135

Please note - unless we state otherwise in the summary, you need to talk to your doctor about joining a trial.

Keith took part in a trial looking into hormone therapy

A picture of Keith

"Health wise I am feeling great. I am a big supporter of trials - it allows new treatments and drugs to be brought in.”

Last reviewed:

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