A study using a questionnaire to improve the quality of life of people with lung cancer (QTIP)

Cancer type:

Lung cancer

Status:

Results

Phase:

Other

This study used a questionnaire to see if it could improve the quality of life of people with lung cancer that are not having cancer treatment.  

More about this trial

People living with lung cancer may have symptoms such as pain and breathlessness, which can affect every part of their life. They can also have other issues such as financial problems. This can reduce their quality of life Open a glossary item.

Doctors usually find out about people’s issues by talking to them at their clinic appointment. But clinics can be busy. There may not be enough time for the doctor to find out about all the problems people have.

We know from research that using a quality of life questionnaire may be better at finding out all these problems.

The aims of this study was to find out if using a quality of life questionnaire could:

  • improve the quality of life for people with lung cancer
  • reduce the need for people with lung cancer to use other health services between clinic appointments

Summary of results

The study team concluded that using a quality of life questionnaire helps doctors to learn more about issues that affect people’s life. But, it doesn’t help to improve their quality of life.

138 people who had a type of lung cancer and who were being seen at the Royal Marsden Hospital took part.

This study was randomised. People were put into 1 of 3 groups:

  • 45 people completed a questionnaire before seeing the doctor. And, the doctor looked at it before the consultation (intervention group)
  • 47 people completed a questionnaire before seeing the doctor. The doctor didn’t look at it before the consultation (attention group)
  • 46 people didn’t complete a questionnaire (control group)

Diagram-showing-QTIP-randomisation

The study team looked at the number of issues discussed during the clinic appointment. The issues included:

Diagram-showing-QOL-issues

They found that on average:

  • 4 issues were discussed in the intervention group
  • 3 issues were discussed in the attention group
  • 2 issues were discussed in the control group 

During the consultation, doctors also acted on the issues they found. People were given advice, tests and medications to help with their problems.

6 weeks later, everyone completed a questionnaire.

Researchers found that after 6 weeks, people’s quality of life was the same in the 3 groups. It had not changed since the start of the study.

Researchers also looked at the number of times people used other health services during the 6 weeks. They found it was the same in the 3 groups.

Researchers concluded that questionnaires help doctors to find out the issues that affect people’s quality of life. But, it doesn’t help to improve the quality of life of people with lung cancer.  

We have based this summary on information from the research team. The information they sent us has been reviewed by independent specialists (peer reviewed Open a glossary item) and published in a medical journal. The figures we quote above were provided by the trial team who did the research. We have not analysed the data ourselves.

Recruitment start:

Recruitment end:

How to join a clinical trial

Please note: In order to join a trial you will need to discuss it with your doctor, unless otherwise specified.

Please note - unless we state otherwise in the summary, you need to talk to your doctor about joining a trial.

Chief Investigator

Dr Mary O’Brien

Supported by

Biomedical Research Centre (BRC) 
Institute of Cancer Research (ICR)
National Institute for Health Research: NIHR
Philips Healthcare
The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust 

Questions about cancer? Contact our information nurses

Freephone 0808 800 4040

Last review date

CRUK internal database number:

7607

Please note - unless we state otherwise in the summary, you need to talk to your doctor about joining a trial.

Around 1 in 5 people take part in clinical trials

3 phases of trials

Around 1 in 5 people diagnosed with cancer in the UK take part in a clinical trial.

Last reviewed:

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