A study to find genetic causes of stomach cancer

Cancer type:

Stomach cancer

Status:

Open

Phase:

Other

This study is looking at genetic causes of stomach cancer in people with a family history of the disease or were diagnosed under 40 years old.

There are many risk factors associated with stomach cancer (gastric cancer). They include infection with a bug called Helicobacter pylori, other medical conditions and possibly having a family history of stomach cancer.

Researchers think some people may have an inherited genetic fault that increases their risk of developing stomach cancer. In this study they will look for genetic faults in people who have 2 or more relatives with stomach cancer, or someone in their family that has a rare form of stomach cancer called diffuse stomach cancer.  In diffuse stomach cancer, the cancer cells affect much of the stomach rather than a specific area. The researchers will also look for genetic faults in people who were diagnosed with stomach cancer before they were 40. The research team will try and identify specific genes that increase the risk of developing stomach cancer.

The aim of the study is to find out more about the genetic causes of stomach cancer. They hope this will lead to better treatment and the possibility of preventing stomach cancer in the future.

Who can enter

You can enter this study if

  • Two or more people in your family have been diagnosed with stomach cancer, they are first or second degree relatives, and one was diagnosed with diffuse stomach cancer under the age of 50 OR
  • Three or more first or second degree relatives in your family have been diagnosed with diffuse stomach cancer at any age OR
  • You were diagnosed with diffuse stomach cancer under the age of 40, even if you don't have a family history OR
  • You have, or a relatives has, been diagnosed with diffuse stomach cancer and lobular breast cancer, and one was diagnosed under the age of 50

Please note; your relatives diagnosed with cancer must be on the same side of the family. A first degree relative is a parent, brother, sister or child. A second degree relative is an aunt, uncle, niece, nephew or grandparent, for example.

Trial design

If you qualify and would like to take part in this study, one of the research team will arrange to ask you a few questions about your own and your family’s medical history. This will either be over the phone or by post, whichever you prefer.

The team may like you to ask your relatives if they would be happy to take part in the study. The more information they collect, the better the results will be.

You will give either a saliva (spit) sample or a blood sample as part of the study.

The research team would also like to look at a sample of your (or your relative’s) cancer. This will have been stored by the hospital when you had a biopsy or operation. With your permission, the team will contact the hospital pathology department about this. They will also ask for a copy of the biopsy results from the lab, just to double check the diagnosis of everyone taking part in the trial.

A few people taking part will have a change (mutation) in a gene called CDH-1, and the research team would like to collect more information about this. If the doctors find that you have a CDH-1 mutation when they look at your cells under the microscope, they will ask you to join the second part of this study called the Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer Registry. You will either have surgery to remove your stomach (a gastrectomy) or the doctors will use small a camera to look inside your stomach (an endoscopy) once a year. They may take biopsies for further study. And they would like to keep all this information on a registry.

Hospital visits

If you give a saliva sample, you can do this at home. If you give a blood sample, you will need to go to your GP surgery. Your GP will send the sample to the research team in Cambridge. You will either speak to one of the research team on the phone, or answer some questions by post.

If you join the second part of this study you will go to hospital for your operation or once a year for your endoscopy.

Side effects

As there are no treatments in the first part of study, there are no side effects. You may get a small bruise if you give a blood sample.

There is more information about surgery to remove your stomach and having an endoscopy on CancerHelp UK.

Location

National

Recruitment start:

Recruitment end:

How to join a clinical trial

Please note: In order to join a trial you will need to discuss it with your doctor, unless otherwise specified.

Please note - unless we state otherwise in the summary, you need to talk to your doctor about joining a trial.

Chief Investigator

Professor C Caldas

Supported by

Cancer Research UK
University of Cambridge

Questions about cancer? Contact our information nurses

Freephone 0808 800 4040

Last review date

CRUK internal database number:

720

Please note - unless we state otherwise in the summary, you need to talk to your doctor about joining a trial.

Charlie took part in a trial to try new treatments

A picture of Charlie

“I think it’s really important that people keep signing up to these type of trials to push research forward.”

Last reviewed:

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