A study to see how genes affect response to the hormone therapy letrozole in women with advanced breast cancer

Cancer type:

Breast cancer

Status:

Results

Phase:

Other

This study was looking at blood and tissue samples and linking them to side effects and treatment outcome in women taking the hormone therapy letrozole (Femara) for advanced breast cancer.

People respond to medication in different ways. For example, the same cancer treatment may cause side effects in one person, such as sickness, but not in another. Or someone having a particular drug may have a better outcome than someone else taking the same drug for the same type of cancer. We know from research that the inherited instructions in our cells (our genes) affect how we respond to treatment.

Researchers had already developed tests to help doctors tell in advance how people will respond to cancer treatment. In this study, researchers wanted to test how useful these methods were in predicting side effects and treatment outcome in different people. They studied blood and tissue samples of women taking the hormone therapy letrozole for advanced breast cancer. They also found out more about the side effects and treatment results they had. The main aims of this study were to

  • Identify genes which may help predict which treatment works best for different people, and who will get side effects
  • Find out the costs involved in introducing tests to predict treatment outcome in different people

Summary of results

This trial was never finished so there are no results available. The researchers were unable to recruit enough patients.

Recruitment start:

Recruitment end:

How to join a clinical trial

Please note: In order to join a trial you will need to discuss it with your doctor, unless otherwise specified.

Please note - unless we state otherwise in the summary, you need to talk to your doctor about joining a trial.

Chief Investigator

Dr William Newman

Supported by

Breast Cancer Campaign
NIHR Clinical Research Network: Cancer
University of Manchester

Questions about cancer? Contact our information nurses

Freephone 0808 800 4040

Last review date

CRUK internal database number:

Oracle 5669

Please note - unless we state otherwise in the summary, you need to talk to your doctor about joining a trial.

Deborah wanted to help other breast cancer patients in the future

A picture of Deborah

“Deborah agreed to take part in a trial as she was keen to help other cancer patients in the future. "If taking part in a trial means others might be helped then I’m very happy with that."

Last reviewed:

Rate this page:

No votes yet
Thank you!
We've recently made some changes to the site, tell us what you think

Share this page