A study of genetic causes of kidney cancer

Cancer type:

Kidney cancer
Renal cell carcinoma

Status:

Open

Phase:

Other

This study is looking at blood samples to find out more about the genetic causes of kidney cancer.

There are many risk factors associated with developing renal cell carcinoma (RCC). This is the most common form of kidney cancer. There are some faulty genes and inherited conditions that increase risk.

This study is looking at people who may have an inherited genetic fault or medical condition that increases their risk of developing RCC. The aim of the study is to find out more about the genetic causes of RCC, and more about how gene faults may increase risk.

Who can enter

You can enter this trial if you have one of the following. You

  • Have 2 close relatives diagnosed with RCC before the age of 60 (or one close relative if you have been diagnosed with RCC before the age of 60)
  • Have 3 close relatives diagnosed with RCC at any age (or 2 close relatives if you have been diagnosed with RCC)
  • Were diagnosed with RCC before the age of 35 (early onset RCC)
  • Have had RCC in both kidneys (bilateral RCC) before age 50
  • Have Birt-Hogg-Dube syndrome

Please note, a close relative can be either

  • A first degree relative - parent, child, brother or sister
  • A second degree relative - aunt, uncle, grandparent, grandchild, niece, nephew, half brother or half sister

Trial design

You will fill out a family history questionnaire. This will ask you about your parents, brothers, sisters and children, and whether any of them have had cancer.

The doctors will take a blood sample. They will use this sample to look for genes that are known to increase risk of kidney cancer. They will also look for possible new genes that may increase risk. This is for research only, and won’t be used for diagnosis. The results won’t affect the care or treatment you or your relatives have.

Hospital visits

This trial is being coordinated in Birmingham, but people can take part across the country. You go to the hospital or to your GP surgery to have a blood sample taken. Apart from that, you won’t have any extra trips to hospital as a result of taking part in this trial. The research team will send you the questionnaire to fill out and post back to them.

Side effects

You may get a small bruise when you have the blood sample taken. There are no other side effects associated with this trial.

Location

Birmingham
Cambridge
Exeter
Leeds
Leicester
Liverpool
London
Manchester
National
Newcastle upon Tyne
Oxford
Sheffield

Recruitment start:

Recruitment end:

How to join a clinical trial

Please note: In order to join a trial you will need to discuss it with your doctor, unless otherwise specified.

Please note - unless we state otherwise in the summary, you need to talk to your doctor about joining a trial.

Chief Investigator

Professor Eamonn Maher

Supported by

Cancer Research UK
European Research Council (ERC)

Questions about cancer? Contact our information nurses

Freephone 0808 800 4040

Last review date

CRUK internal database number:

447

Please note - unless we state otherwise in the summary, you need to talk to your doctor about joining a trial.

Charlie took part in a trial to try new treatments

A picture of Charlie

“I think it’s really important that people keep signing up to these type of trials to push research forward.”

Last reviewed:

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