A study using MRI scan to see how well chemotherapy is working in people with bowel cancer

Please note - this trial is no longer recruiting patients. We hope to add results when they are available.

Cancer type:

Bowel (colorectal) cancer
Colon cancer
Rectal cancer

Status:

Closed

Phase:

Other

This study is looking at using a new type of MRI scan to see how well chemotherapy is working in people with bowel (colorectal) cancer.

Doctors can treat bowel cancer with chemotherapy. They use CT scans to find out how well the chemotherapy is working. They also use PET scans to find out if the cancer has spread.

The researchers think a new type of MRI scan, called a DW MRI scan, may work just as well at finding out about both of these.

The aim of this study is to find out how good the DW MRI scan is at finding out how well chemotherapy is working and if bowel cancer has spread.

Who can enter

You may be able to enter this trial if you go to a cancer clinic at the Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust and you

You cannot enter this trial if you

  • Are taking any drug that affects blood vessel growth (your doctor can tell you about this)
  • Have had chemotherapy or radiotherapy in the past month
  • Have a large amount of fluid collected around your tummy (ascites)
  • Have a pacemaker or other metal in your body
  • Can’t stand to be in small spaces (you are claustrophobic)
  • Are unable to lie flat and still for at least an hour

Trial design

This study will recruit 25 people who go to a cancer clinic at the Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust.

Everyone will have a MRI scan at the Charing Cross Hospital before starting chemotherapy. You have another scan within 2 weeks after your first chemotherapy treatment.

The researchers will ask some people to have a 2nd MRI scan before starting chemotherapy. You have this at the same visit as the 1st scan, with a short break in between.

Hospital visits

You have 2 visits to Charing Cross Hospital as part of the trial. Each will last about an hour.

If you are having the 2nd scan, your first visit will be about 30 to 40 minutes longer.

Side effects

An MRI scan is a safe test. There shouldn’t be any side effects.

We have information about MRI scans.

Recruitment start:

Recruitment end:

How to join a clinical trial

Please note: In order to join a trial you will need to discuss it with your doctor, unless otherwise specified.

Please note - unless we state otherwise in the summary, you need to talk to your doctor about joining a trial.

Chief Investigator

Dr Rohini Sharma

Supported by

Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC)
Imperial College London
Imperial College of Science Technology and Medicine
Medical Research Council (MRC)
NIHR Clinical Research Network: Cancer

Questions about cancer? Contact our information nurses

Freephone 0808 800 4040

Last review date

CRUK internal database number:

Oracle - 111250

Please note - unless we state otherwise in the summary, you need to talk to your doctor about joining a trial.

Over 60,000 cancer patients enrolled on clinical trials in the UK last year.

Last reviewed:

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