A study looking at why some people take longer than others to be diagnosed with myeloma or lymphoma

Please note - this trial is no longer recruiting patients. We hope to add results when they are available.

Cancer type:

Lymphoma
Myeloma
Non-Hodgkin lymphoma

Status:

Closed

Phase:

Other

This study is looking at people who have been told they have myeloma or lymphoma. This study is supported by Cancer Research UK as part of the National Awareness and Early Detection Initiative (NAEDI).

Researchers know that the time it takes to find out if someone has cancer can vary a lot. They want to know why this is. In this study they are looking at people who have been told they have myeloma or lymphoma.

The aims of this study are to

  • Find out why it takes longer to diagnose myeloma or lymphoma in some people than others
  • Find ways to speed up the time it takes to diagnose myeloma or lymphoma

Who can enter

You may be able to enter this trial if you

  • Have just been told you have myeloma or lymphoma
  • Are seeing your cancer doctor at a hospital in the Yorkshire, Humber and Yorkshire Coast Cancer Network areas
  • Are at least 18 years old

Trial design

This study will recruit about 65 people who have been recently diagnosed with myeloma or lymphoma.

During an interview a researcher will ask about your experiences from the time you first went to your doctor (GP Open a glossary item) until you were told you had cancer.

Hospital visits

You don’t need to make any extra visits to hospital for this study. If you’ve recently been diagnosed with myeloma or lymphoma, a researcher will contact you by post, or in the hospital clinic. If you agree to join the study, they will arrange an interview at a place convenient to you, for example, at the hospital where you are being seen, or in your own home. The interview will take about an hour.

Side effects

There are no side effects from taking part in this study. But you may find it hard to talk about your experiences. If this happens, the researcher will offer to stop the interview and continue at another time. And they will offer you further support if you would like it.

Recruitment start:

Recruitment end:

How to join a clinical trial

Please note: In order to join a trial you will need to discuss it with your doctor, unless otherwise specified.

Please note - unless we state otherwise in the summary, you need to talk to your doctor about joining a trial.

Chief Investigator

Dr Debra Howell

Supported by

Bloodwise
National Awareness and Early Diagnosis Initiative (NAEDI)
NIHR Clinical Research Network: Cancer
University of York
Yorkshire and Humberside Haematology Network

Questions about cancer? Contact our information nurses

Freephone 0808 800 4040

Last review date

CRUK internal database number:

Oracle 9579

Please note - unless we state otherwise in the summary, you need to talk to your doctor about joining a trial.

Around 1 in 5 people take part in clinical trials

3 phases of trials

Around 1 in 5 people diagnosed with cancer in the UK take part in a clinical trial.

Last reviewed:

Rate this page:

No votes yet
Thank you!
We've recently made some changes to the site, tell us what you think