A study looking at using mobile phones to report side effects of chemotherapy (ASyMS III Study)

Please note - this trial is no longer recruiting patients. We hope to add results when they are available.

Cancer type:

Bowel (colorectal) cancer
Breast cancer

Status:

Closed

Phase:

Other

This study is looking at using a mobile phone at home for people to report side effects they may have during their course of chemotherapy.

The responses you give on the mobile phone will decide whether you receive self care information on the phone (if mild side effects are reported), or receive a call from a health care professional (if the side effects are more serious).

This study is open to those people with breast cancer or bowel cancer who are having chemotherapy after their main treatment. This is called adjuvant chemotherapy Open a glossary item.

The main aim of this study is to find out the impact that using the mobile phone (ASyMS system) has on the care of people having adjuvant chemotherapy.

Who can enter

You may be able to enter this study if you

  • Have breast cancer or bowel cancer
  • Are having at least 4 cycles of chemotherapy after your main treatment (adjuvant chemotherapy Open a glossary item)
  • Are at least 18 years old

Trial design

This study will recruit 324 people in total. It is in 3 stages.

In stage 1 the researchers will collect information about the care given to people during their chemotherapy. They will do this by recruiting 150 people from across the UK to complete a series of questionnaires during their chemotherapy treatment. The questionnaires ask how you are feeling, if you are able to look after yourself and about any symptoms you may have. You will also be asked to keep a diary, and record any medicines you take during the course of your chemotherapy treatment and any health professionals, for example your GP, you may see.

The researcher will also ask your permission to interview you every month from the start of your chemotherapy to the end. They will ask you about your treatment and care. If you don’t want to be interviewed you don’t have to.

Stage 2 is a pilot study. The researchers want to test the mobile phone system. They will recruit 24 people from across the UK to use the mobile phone system during their chemotherapy treatment. The research nurse will show you how to use the system.

Twice a day, or at any time you feel unwell, you fill in a questionnaire on the mobile phone. It will ask about any symptoms you have. This information will be sent securely to your nurse or doctor. They will be alerted if any of your symptoms need to be managed. After receiving the alert, your doctor or nurse will look at a secure web page detailing the symptoms that you have reported and will contact you if necessary. Or you will receive self care information.

ASyMS III Study Diagram

You will have a booklet on how to use the mobile phone. It will also have a list of helpful telephone numbers. You will have a diary to write down any problems you have using the mobile phone and to record the medicines you take and any health professional, for example your GP, you may see.

You will also be asked to fill in questionnaires at the start of using the phone, and at the end of a chemotherapy cycle. The questionnaires will ask about how you are feeling, if you are able to look after yourself and about any symptoms you may have.

In stage 3 the researchers want to test the mobile phone system using a larger number of people. They will recruit 150 people from across the UK to use the mobile phone system. You do the same as people in stage 2 except that you will be using the phone to record your side effects for all of your chemotherapy treatment.

The researcher will also ask your permission to interview you every month from the start of your chemotherapy to the end. They will ask you about your treatment and care. If you don’t want to be interviewed you don’t have to.

Hospital visits

It is unlikely that there will be any extra visits if you agree to take part in this study. If you agree to the interview, the researchers will interview you when you attend the clinic for your routine chemotherapy appointment.

Side effects

The researchers don’t anticipate any side effects from taking part in this study. However filling in a daily questionnaire about any symptoms you may have, may cause you to think more about them.

Recruitment start:

Recruitment end:

How to join a clinical trial

Please note: In order to join a trial you will need to discuss it with your doctor, unless otherwise specified.

Please note - unless we state otherwise in the summary, you need to talk to your doctor about joining a trial.

Chief Investigator

Prof Nora Kearney

Supported by

Burdett Trust
Macmillan Cancer Support
NIHR Clinical Research Network: Cancer
Philips
University of Surrey

Questions about cancer? Contact our information nurses

Freephone 0808 800 4040

Last review date

CRUK internal database number:

Oracle 9244

Please note - unless we state otherwise in the summary, you need to talk to your doctor about joining a trial.

Wendy took part in a new trial studying the possible side effect of hearing loss

A picture of Wendy

"I was delighted to take part in a clinical trial as it has the potential to really help others in the future.”

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