A study looking at how often people being treated with lenalidomide and dexamethasone for myeloma have a very low number of white blood cells

Please note - this trial is no longer recruiting patients. We hope to add results when they are available.

Cancer type:

Blood cancers
Myeloma

Status:

Closed

Phase:

Other

This study is looking at how often people being treated for myeloma have a very low number of white blood cells (neutropenia).

Doctors can treat myeloma with chemotherapy, biological therapy and steroids. If myeloma stops responding to treatment, or comes back after treatment, you may have a drug called lenalidomide and the steroid drug dexamethasone. This treatment can cause some people to have a low white blood cell count. Researchers want to find out how often this happens and how doctors usually treat it. In this study, they will do this by looking at people’s medical notes.

The aim of the study is to see how often people with myeloma having lenalidomide and dexamethasone have a low white blood cell count, and how this is treated.

Who can enter

You can enter this trial if you

  • Are about to start, or have started in the past 4 weeks, treatment with dexamethasone and lenalidomide for myeloma that has stopped responding to earlier treatment or has come back
  • Are at least 18 years old

You cannot enter this trial if you

  • Are having any other chemotherapy for myeloma
  • Have had any treatment as part of a trial in the last month

Trial design

This is an international study and will recruit up to 200 people in 40 hospitals.

The researchers will look at your medical notes to see whether you had a low white blood count, and if so how your doctors treated you. They will record this information for up to a year. You will not have any extra treatment for low blood count or for myeloma as part of this study.

The researchers will not tell your doctors how to treat you and there are no extra tests or questionnaires to fill in.

You will not get any direct benefit from taking part in this study, but it may help people in the future.

Hospital visits

There are no extra hospital visits.

Side effects

There are no side effects associated with taking part in this study.

There is more information on CancerHelp UK about the possible side effects of lenalidomide and dexamethasone.

Recruitment start:

Recruitment end:

How to join a clinical trial

Please note: In order to join a trial you will need to discuss it with your doctor, unless otherwise specified.

Please note - unless we state otherwise in the summary, you need to talk to your doctor about joining a trial.

Chief Investigator

Dr Williams

Supported by

Amgen

Questions about cancer? Contact our information nurses

Freephone 0808 800 4040

Last review date

CRUK internal database number:

Oracle - 8194

Please note - unless we state otherwise in the summary, you need to talk to your doctor about joining a trial.

Wendy took part in a new trial studying the possible side effect of hearing loss

A picture of Wendy

"I was delighted to take part in a clinical trial as it has the potential to really help others in the future.”

Last reviewed:

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