A study looking at lifestyle changes after treatment for bowel cancer

Cancer type:

Bowel (colorectal) cancer
Colon cancer
Rectal cancer

Status:

Results

Phase:

Pilot

This study aimed to find out if people treated for bowel cancer are interested in a programme to help them make changes to their diet and exercise levels. The programme included written information on how to make these changes and regular follow up phone calls from the study team.

More about this trial

We know from research that changes to our lifestyle can help prevent or reduce our risk of getting some types of cancer.

Researchers wanted to find out if people are interested in a programme to help them make lifestyle changes after treatment for bowel cancer (colorectal cancer). They also wanted to find out if people liked the programme and if it helped them to change their behaviour.

In this study, researchers looked at changes that you can make to your diet, how much physical activity you do and how much alcohol you drink.

Summary of results

The study team found people in this study were interested in taking part in a lifestyle programme.

29 people who had recently finished treatment for colorectal cancer joined this small study. They took part in a 3 month programme to help change their lifestyle.

The study team gave everyone written information describing the evidence for the benefits of a healthy lifestyle. Everyone filled in a questionnaire about their diet, level of activity and alcohol consumption before the study started and when it had finished. The researchers also phoned everyone every 2 weeks to find out how they were getting on. They made suggestions to help people improve their diet, do more exercise and reduce the amount of alcohol they drink.

The researchers found that people were interested in taking part in this study. Most completed the programme and importantly they liked taking part.

The researchers looked at the information that people provided about their diet and physical activity. They found that on average, people were eating a healthier diet and doing more exercise by the end of the study. People also rated their quality of life higher at the end of the study and said the ability to do their usual daily activities had improved.  Alcohol consumption was generally low in this group of people.

The researchers concluded that this study did help people to make changes to their diet and exercise levels. They say that using a combination of written information and telephone consultations was useful way of helping people to make these changes.

We have based this summary on information from the research team. The information they sent us has been reviewed by independent specialists (peer reviewed Open a glossary item) and published in a medical journal. The figures we quote above were provided by the research team. We have not analysed the data ourselves.

Recruitment start:

Recruitment end:

How to join a clinical trial

Please note: In order to join a trial you will need to discuss it with your doctor, unless otherwise specified.

Please note - unless we state otherwise in the summary, you need to talk to your doctor about joining a trial.

Chief Investigator

Dr Alice Simon

Supported by

NIHR Clinical Research Network: Cancer
University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust
World Cancer Research Fund

Questions about cancer? Contact our information nurses

Freephone 0808 800 4040

Last review date

CRUK internal database number:

Oracle - 8354

Please note - unless we state otherwise in the summary, you need to talk to your doctor about joining a trial.

Cara took part in a clinical trial

A picture of Cara

"I am glad that taking part in a trial might help others on their own cancer journey.”

Last reviewed:

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