A study looking at cell changes in ovarian cancer (AKTRES)

Please note - this trial is no longer recruiting patients. We hope to add results when they are available.

Cancer type:

Ovarian cancer

Status:

Closed

Phase:

Other

This study is looking at changes in ovarian cancer cells when women have a drug called GSK2110183. This study is for women who are taking part in a trial of GSK2110183 with chemotherapy for ovarian cancer.

GSK2110183 is a type of biological therapy. It is a cancer growth blocker. It stops signals that cancer cells use to divide and grow.

In this study the researchers want to identify and measure the changes that GSK2110183 causes in cancer cells. To do this, they will take blood samples and tissue samples from women before they start treatment with GSK2110183 and afterwards.

They hope that their research will help predict who may benefit from having treatment. And that future treatment could be better tailored for individual women.   

Please note – You won’t get any direct benefit from taking part in this study, nor will it affect any treatment you have. But it may help patients in the future.

Who can enter

You may be able to enter this trial if you are taking part in a trial of GSK2110183 with chemotherapy for ovarian cancer and

  • Your ovarian cancer, fallopian tube cancer or primary peritoneal cancer is longer than 2 cm
  • Samples of tissue (biopsies Open a glossary item) can be taken from your cancer
  • You have had a scan that shows your cancer has continued to grow within 6 months of treatment with platinum chemotherapy Open a glossary item
  • You are at least 18 years old

You cannot enter this trial if you are taking warfarin or low molecular weight heparin to stop your blood clotting.  

Trial design

This study will recruit 30 people who are also taking part in a trial of GSK2110183 with chemotherapy for ovarian cancer.

When you have blood tests in the trial, extra blood samples will be taken at the same time for this study.  

You have a tissue sample (biopsy Open a glossary item) of your cancer taken once before you start treatment. The researchers will also ask for a 2nd tissue sample 3 weeks after starting treatment. You don’t have to have the 2nd sample taken.

The researchers will also ask for a sample of your cancer that was removed when you had surgery or a previous biopsy.

If you need to have fluid drained from around your tummy (abdomen), the researchers will take a sample of the fluid.

The researchers will use these samples to find out how GSK2110183 works. They will also use them to develop tests to try and predict who may benefit from this treatment.

Hospital visits

You go to the hospital to have the tissue samples taken.

Side effects

You may have some bruising or bleeding after giving blood samples and tissue samples.

Recruitment start:

Recruitment end:

How to join a clinical trial

Please note: In order to join a trial you will need to discuss it with your doctor, unless otherwise specified.

Please note - unless we state otherwise in the summary, you need to talk to your doctor about joining a trial.

Chief Investigator

Dr Sarah Blagden

Supported by

Experimental Cancer Medicine Centre (ECMC)
Imperial College London
NIHR Clinical Research Network: Cancer
Ovarian Cancer Action

Questions about cancer? Contact our information nurses

Freephone 0808 800 4040

Last review date

CRUK internal database number:

Oracle 10015

Please note - unless we state otherwise in the summary, you need to talk to your doctor about joining a trial.

Over 60,000 cancer patients enrolled on clinical trials in the UK last year.

Last reviewed:

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