A study looking at why people respond differently to the same chemotherapy (PG SNPS)

Please note - this trial is no longer recruiting patients. We hope to add results when they are available.

Cancer type:

Breast cancer

Status:

Closed

Phase:

Other

This study is looking at blood samples from women with breast cancer to see why they have different side effects and results from the same chemotherapy . It is for women who have taken part in one of the breast cancer trials NEAT, McNEAT, tAnGO or Neo-tAnGo. Or, had taxane chemotherapy, or epirubicin with CMF chemotherapy, in the West Anglia Cancer Research Network.

Researchers believe that side effects and differences in results could be linked to how your body handles chemotherapy. They will use blood samples to study the characteristics of certain genes that tell your body how to process drugs. They will look at the side effects and treatment outcome of each person in the study. They will build a record (profile) of these results. In future, doctors may be able to look at this record and predict which chemotherapy will work best for a particular person.

You will not have any direct benefit from taking part in this study, and it is unlikely to change your treatment plan. But the results of the study will be used to help people with cancer in the future. The aims of this study are to

  • Look at the chemotherapy side effects from these trials, and see how common they are
  • Learn more about the genes that may affect side effects and response to chemotherapy
  • See how accurate gene profiles are at predicting side effects and treatment outcome

Who can enter

You can enter this study if you

  • Have taken part in one of the breast cancer trials NEAT, McNEAT, tAnGO or Neo-tAnGo or
  • Have had CMF chemotherapy with epirubicin (E-CMF), with or without a taxane chemotherapy at a centre in the West Anglia Cancer Research Network (WACRN)

You cannot enter this study if you

  • Have not taken part in any of these trials, or the above treatment within the West Anglia Cancer Research Network

Trial design

This is a national study. It hopes to recruit nearly 5,000 people. Everyone will have one blood test or spit (saliva) test. (Please note: after June 2009 the study teams will stop collecting blood samples, and collect spit samples only).

Hospital visits

If you are having chemotherapy, you will give your study blood sample at the same time as your routine pre chemotherapy blood test. So you will not have an extra needle.

If you are not having chemotherapy, you will give your blood sample when you agree to take part in the study, or at your next routine clinic appointment.

If you cannot get to the hospital, it may be possible to give your blood sample at your GP surgery or local hospital. Or instead you may be able to give a spit (saliva) sample at home and return it to the research team by post.

Side effects

As there are no treatments, there are no side effects. You may have a small bruise where you had your blood test.

Recruitment start:

Recruitment end:

How to join a clinical trial

Please note: In order to join a trial you will need to discuss it with your doctor, unless otherwise specified.

Please note - unless we state otherwise in the summary, you need to talk to your doctor about joining a trial.

Chief Investigator

Dr Jean Abraham

Supported by

Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust
Cancer Research UK
Experimental Cancer Medicine Centre (ECMC)
NIHR Clinical Research Network: Cancer
University of Cambridge

Questions about cancer? Contact our information nurses

Freephone 0808 800 4040

Last review date

CRUK internal database number:

Oracle 1350

Please note - unless we state otherwise in the summary, you need to talk to your doctor about joining a trial.

Harriet wanted to try new treatments

Picture of Harriet

“I was keen to go on a clinical trial. I wanted to try new cancer treatments and hopefully help future generations.”

Last reviewed:

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