A study looking at a walking programme for people who have cancer that has come back or spread to another part of the body (CanWalk)

Please note - this trial is no longer recruiting patients. We hope to add results when they are available.

Cancer type:

All cancer types

Status:

Closed

Phase:

Other

This study is looking at whether regular walking could help to improve how people with cancer feel physically and emotionally. It is for people who have cancer that has come back (recurrent cancer) or has spread to another part of their body (metastatic cancer).

Exercise can improve quality of life Open a glossary item and reduce tiredness (fatigue) in people with recurrent or metastatic cancer. But many exercise programmes need people to go to a specialist centre and have supervised sessions.  People may not find this acceptable or affordable in the long term.

In this study, researchers are looking at walking programmes that you can do from home.

The aims of the study are find out

  • If community based walking programmes would be acceptable to people with cancer that has come back or spread
  • Whether a walking programme improves how people feel physically and emotionally

Who can enter

Your consultant or specialist nurse may ask you to join this study if you are being cared for at Guy’s and St Thomas’ Hospital or King’s College Hospital and you

  • Are at least 16 years old
  • Have been told that you have cancer that has come back or spread to another part of your body
  • Are able to walk for at least 30 minutes

You cannot join this study if you

  • Have cancer that has spread to your bones and your doctor thinks this would stop you joining a walking programme
  • Can’t speak or understand English

Trial design

The researchers need at least 60 people to join the study. If you agree, a member of the study team will contact you by phone. They will tell you more about the study and ask if you can walk for at least 30 minutes. If you can, and you’re still interested in taking part, they will send you a consent form Open a glossary itemand a questionnaire to fill in.

It is a randomised study. People who return the questionnaire and consent form are put into 1 of 2 groups at random. Neither they nor the study team can decide which group they are in.

People in one group take part in a walking programme. This is called the intervention group. People in the other group will be asked to continue their activities as usual during the study. This is called the control group.

CanWalk trial diagram

If you are in the intervention group, a researcher spends 10 minutes talking to you about the walking plan. This can be on the phone or face to face. They will also give you some printed (or online) information about the programme and details of local walking groups.

They will ask you to take part in at least one local walking group activity per week and to do some walking every other day for 3 months. This can be on your own or with a local group.

The study team will ask people in both groups to fill out some questionnaires

  • When you join the study
  • After 6 weeks, 12 weeks and 24 weeks

The questionnaires will ask about your quality of life, the physical exercise you do, how tired you feel and whether you believe you can reach your exercise goals. It takes about 15 minutes to complete the questionnaires each time.

The study team will also ask half the people in the intervention group and half the people in the control group to wear a pedometer for 7 days on 4 separate occasions. A pedometer is a small device that measures the level of physical activity you do. The people they ask to wear a pedometer will be chosen at random.

The researchers will also ask 5 people in each group to have a telephone interview with a member of the study team. In this, they will ask whether you think it is acceptable to take part in a walking programme. They will make an audio recording of the interview.

Hospital visits

If you are in the intervention group, you need to spend at least 1½  hours per week walking. You can choose to fit this in with other activities, but you must join at least one local walking group activity per week.

If you agree to take part in a telephone interview, it will be arranged at a time that is convenient for you. It will last about half an hour.

Side effects

By checking that you can walk for 30 minutes, the researchers don’t think the walking involved will cause you any problems.

Recruitment start:

Recruitment end:

How to join a clinical trial

Please note: In order to join a trial you will need to discuss it with your doctor, unless otherwise specified.

Please note - unless we state otherwise in the summary, you need to talk to your doctor about joining a trial.

Chief Investigator

Dr Jo Armes

Supported by

Dimbleby Cancer Care
King's College London
NIHR Clinical Research Network: Cancer

Questions about cancer? Contact our information nurses

Freephone 0808 800 4040

Last review date

CRUK internal database number:

Oracle 11970

Please note - unless we state otherwise in the summary, you need to talk to your doctor about joining a trial.

Cara took part in a clinical trial

A picture of Cara

"I am glad that taking part in a trial might help others on their own cancer journey.”

Last reviewed:

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