A study looking at the genetics of lobular carcinoma in situ (GLACIER)

Cancer type:

Breast cancer

Status:

Results

Phase:

Other

This study looked at genetic changes that may increase the risk of lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) or invasive lobular breast cancer. This trial was supported by Cancer Research UK.

LCIS is not cancer but means that there are changes to some of the cells in the breast. Having LCIS increases your risk of getting breast cancer in the future.

In this study, the researchers looked at genetic changes in a large number of women who had been diagnosed with LCIS or a type of breast cancer called invasive lobular breast cancer. They hoped to find out more about the genetic causes.

The aim of the study was to identify genetic changes that may increase the risk of LCIS or invasive lobular breast cancer.

Summary of results

The research team found one new genetic change that they think increases the risk of developing invasive lobular breast cancer.

The research team looked at the genes of

  • 1,470 women with invasive lobular breast cancer
  • 312 women with lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS)
  • 4,755 women who didn’t have breast cancer (the control group)

Genes are codes that tell our cells how to behave. They are grouped together in 23 pairs of chromosomes. The research team looking at the samples in this study found a change on chromosome number 7 that they think increases the risk of lobular breast cancer. The change on chromosome 7 does not appear to be linked to invasive ductal breast cancer, the most common form of breast cancer.

They also found that some of the known genetic changes that increase the risk of breast cancer in general, increase the risk of developing LCIS or invasive lobular breast cancer in particular.

The research team concluded that some genetic changes increase the risk of all breast cancers, and some increase the risk of specific types of breast cancer.

We have based this summary on information from the team who ran the trial. The information they sent us has been reviewed by independent specialists (peer reviewed Open a glossary item) and published in a medical journal. The figures we quote above were provided by the trial team. We have not analysed the data ourselves.

Recruitment start:

Recruitment end:

How to join a clinical trial

Please note: In order to join a trial you will need to discuss it with your doctor, unless otherwise specified.

Please note - unless we state otherwise in the summary, you need to talk to your doctor about joining a trial.

Chief Investigator

Dr Rebecca Roylance
Dr Elinor Sawyer

Supported by

Breast Cancer Campaign
Cancer Research UK
Experimental Cancer Medicine Centre (ECMC)
NIHR Clinical Research Network: Cancer

Other information

This is Cancer Research UK trial number CRUK/07/075. 

Questions about cancer? Contact our information nurses

Freephone 0808 800 4040

Last review date

CRUK internal database number:

Oracle 1013

Please note - unless we state otherwise in the summary, you need to talk to your doctor about joining a trial.

Harriet wanted to try new treatments

A picture of Harriet

“I was keen to go on a clinical trial. I wanted to try new cancer treatments and hopefully help future generations.”

Last reviewed:

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