A study looking at the experiences of men who have had prostate, testicular or penile cancer

Please note - this trial is no longer recruiting patients. We hope to add results when they are available.

Cancer type:

Penile cancer
Prostate cancer
Testicular cancer





This is a study to learn more about how certain male cancers affect men’s relationships, and how they and their partners cope.

Researchers want to learn more about the challenges men face when they have prostate, testicular or penile cancer. They want to find out how their relationships change and how couples adjust.

In this study, they will talk to men who have had cancer treatment and to their partners. They hope the information they collect will help to improve support services for men in the future.

The aims of the study are to

  • Learn more about couples’ experiences and how they have coped
  • See if there are different challenges and ways of coping depending on the type of cancer men have

Who can enter

You may be able to take part in this study if you have been having treatment for prostate, testicular or penile cancer at Morriston Hospital in Swansea or University of Wales Hospital, Cardiff. The researchers may ask to join the study if

  • It is at least 18 months since you had surgery
  • You are at least 18 years old

Trial design

The study team want to talk to 15 men who are in relationships. They also want to talk to 15 partners.

If you agree to take part, you will have an interview with a researcher. They will ask about your experiences and how you coped.

With your permission, they will make an audio recording of the interview. All the information you give is confidential Open a glossary item.  It will not be possible to identify you in any results from the study.

The researchers may use some quotes on a website to help other people. If they use any quotes, they are re-recorded by another person who won’t know who said the original words. This means nobody will know the words are yours and nobody will hear your voice.

Hospital visits

The study team will arrange the interview at a time and place that is convenient for you. They expect it to take between half an hour and an hour.

Side effects

You may find talking about your experiences upsetting, You can stop the interview at any time. The study team will give you details of support services that can help you.

Recruitment start:

Recruitment end:

How to join a clinical trial

Please note: In order to join a trial you will need to discuss it with your doctor, unless otherwise specified.

Please note - unless we state otherwise in the summary, you need to talk to your doctor about joining a trial.

Chief Investigator

Professor Kate Bullen

Supported by

Aberystwyth University
Morriston Hospital
NIHR Clinical Research Network: Cancer
University of Wales Hospital Cardiff

Questions about cancer? Contact our information nurses

Freephone 0808 800 4040

Last review date

CRUK internal database number:

Oracle 11225

Please note - unless we state otherwise in the summary, you need to talk to your doctor about joining a trial.

Charlie took part in a trial to try new treatments

A picture of Charlie

“I think it’s really important that people keep signing up to these type of trials to push research forward.”

Last reviewed:

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