A study looking at a new way of MRI scan reporting before surgery for rectal cancer (Beyond TME)

Cancer type:

Bowel (colorectal) cancer
Rectal cancer

Status:

Open

Phase:

Other

This study is looking at a new and more detailed way of reporting MRI scans before surgery for rectal cancer. It is for people who have rectal cancer that has grown into surrounding tissues or has come back after treatment.

More about this trial

Doctors usually treat rectal cancer with surgery. Sometimes people need more extensive surgery to remove their tumour. This is called exenterative surgery. It usually involves removing other organs within the area between your hipbones (your pelvis) in order to remove the entire tumour.

Before you have exenterative surgery, you have an MRI scan to see how far the cancer has grown. And a PET-CT scan Open a glossary item to show that it hasn’t spread outside of the pelvis to another part of the body.

The researchers in this study are looking at a new and more detailed way of reporting the MRI scan. They hope this will give the surgeon carrying out your exenterative surgery more information about the tumour.

The aims of the study are to find out if the new way of MRI scan reporting

  • results in improved surgical planning and how well people do after surgery
  • is accurate in checking how far the cancer has spread before surgery

Joining this study will not change your treatment, and you may not get any direct benefit from taking part. The researchers hope that the information they collect will help to improve MRI reporting before exenterative surgery for rectal cancer in the future.

Who can enter

The following bullet points list the entry conditions for this study. If you are unsure about any of these speak with your doctor or the study team. They will be able to advise you.

You may be able to join this study if all of the following apply.

  • You have rectal cancer that has grown into surrounding tissues or come back after treatment
  • You have had an MRI scan, a CT scan and possibly a PET-CT scan to assess the cancer
  • You are having treatment at the Royal Marsden Hospital in London or Surrey
  • You are at least 18 years old

You cannot join this study if any of these apply. You

  • Have rectal cancer that has spread to another part of the body and it isn’t possible to remove it with an operation
  • Can’t have an MRI for any reason, for example, you have certain types of metal surgical clips, metal pins or plates or a pacemaker
  • Have anal cancer Open a glossary item
  • Have diabetes that isn’t well controlled with medication

Trial design

The researchers need about 210 people to take part. The study is for people having treatment at the Royal Marsden Hospital in London or Surrey. The researchers expect about one third (70 people) will go on to have exenterative surgery.

If you are going to have surgery this will go ahead as usual. Your doctor can tell you more about this and how long you stay in hospital afterwards.

After surgery, specialist doctors will look at the removed bowel cancer section to confirm how far the cancer has spread. Depending on this, you may need further treatment such as chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Your doctor can tell you more if this applies to you.

The researchers will compare the laboratory findings with the information in the detailed MRI scan report. This will help them to work out how accurate the new way of MRI reporting is.

The study team will also ask to keep a tissue sample from your surgery to check for cancer gene changes (mutations Open a glossary item).

If you do not have surgery, you may or may not be offered other treatments such as radiotherapy or chemotherapy and these will go ahead as usual.

The study team will ask you to fill out a questionnaire when you are first seen and then at

  • 1 year  
  • 2 years
  • 3 years

This questionnaire will ask how you’ve been feeling. This is called a quality of life study Open a glossary item.

Hospital visits

You won’t have any extra hospital visits or tests as a result of taking part in this study.

Side effects

The researchers don’t expect there to be any side effects as a result of taking part in this study. 

Location

London
Sutton

Recruitment start:

Recruitment end:

How to join a clinical trial

Please note: In order to join a trial you will need to discuss it with your doctor, unless otherwise specified.

Please note - unless we state otherwise in the summary, you need to talk to your doctor about joining a trial.

Chief Investigator

Dr Gina Brown

Supported by

Pelican Cancer Foundation
The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust 

Questions about cancer? Contact our information nurses

Freephone 0808 800 4040

Last review date

CRUK internal database number:

13410

Please note - unless we state otherwise in the summary, you need to talk to your doctor about joining a trial.

Cara took part in a clinical trial

A picture of Cara

"I am glad that taking part in a trial might help others on their own cancer journey.”

Last reviewed:

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