A trial looking at chemotherapy for prostate cancer that has stopped responding to treatment (CL56)

Cancer type:

Prostate cancer

Status:

Results

Phase:

Phase 2

This trial looked at 2 chemotherapy drugs called lomustine and chlorambucil for men with prostate cancer that was no longer responding to hormone therapy. Doctors call this hormone refractory prostate cancer.

Prostate cancer that has stopped responding to hormone therapy can be more difficult to treat. So doctors sometimes use chemotherapy to help slow cancer growth.

Lomustine and chlorambucil is a new combination of chemotherapy for men with prostate cancer.

The aim of this trial was to see how well the combination of lomustine and chlorambucil works for men with prostate cancer when hormone treatment has stopped working. And to find out more about side effects.

Summary of results

The researchers found that two thirds of men in this trial responded to the combination of lomustine and chlorambucil.

This small trial recruited 37 men. Everybody who took part had lomustine and chlorambucil. The men had an average of 2 treatment cycles each.

The doctors analysed the results in 2005. They looked at PSA blood test results following treatment to find out how well treatment worked. They found

  • In 1 man the PSA level returned to a normal level for at least 4 weeks – researchers called this 'complete response
  • In 2 men, the PSA level halved and did not rise again for at least 4 weeks – researchers called this ‘partial response
  • In 17 men the PSA level stayed the same for at least 8 weeks – researchers called this ‘stable disease
  • In 12 men the PSA continued to rise, or a CT scan showed the cancer had continued to grow
  • They didn’t have the results for 5 men

The main side effects were mild and included tiredness and constipation. A very small number of men had a drop in blood counts.

We have based this summary on information from the team who ran the trial. The information they sent us has been reviewed by independent specialists (peer reviewed) and published in a medical journal. The figures we quote above were provided by the trial team. We have not analysed the data ourselves.

Recruitment start:

Recruitment end:

How to join a clinical trial

Please note: In order to join a trial you will need to discuss it with your doctor, unless otherwise specified.

Please note - unless we state otherwise in the summary, you need to talk to your doctor about joining a trial.

Chief Investigator

Dr J Shamash

Supported by

Barts Health NHS Trust

Questions about cancer? Contact our information nurses

Freephone 0808 800 4040

Last review date

CRUK internal database number:

Oracle - 162

Please note - unless we state otherwise in the summary, you need to talk to your doctor about joining a trial.

Keith took part in a trial looking into hormone therapy

A picture of Keith

"Health wise I am feeling great. I am a big supporter of trials - it allows new treatments and drugs to be brought in.”

Last reviewed:

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